Mainie Ethics

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Mainie embraces Fair Trade principles and is strongly committed to supporting Aboriginal artists to preserve and regenerate their traditional cultural heritage. All of the Aboriginal artworks featured on Mainie’s silk creations are acquired ethically and under licence through the internationally acclaimed Warlukurlangu Artists, an Aboriginal owned and controlled arts centre, in accordance with the Indigenous Art Code. Royalties from the sale of every Mainie garment are paid to the Aboriginal artists.

The art centre has long been a stronghold of culture and language for the Warlpiri people from the remote Tanami Desert region, and a place where women artists are keeping their ancient tribal traditions alive by capturing in intricate dot paintings, the ceremonial designs which have been passed down to them over thousands of years.

Mainie invests in the economic development of Aboriginal women artists and their communities by:
  • Purchasing original artworks in accordance with the Indigenous Art Code
  • Acquiring licences to legally reproduce the artworks
  • Paying royalty fees to the artists from the sales of products.

Mainie is a wholly Australian owned company with a bold vision to take Australia’s unique Aboriginal fine arts heritage to the world.

Artists 

Yarrabah is a coastal Aboriginal community located south east of Cairns. It is home to one of Australia’s largest Aboriginal communities with a population of over 2,000 people.  The Yarrabah area was originally inhabited by the Gunggandji people.  Many of the direct descendants of the Gunggandji people still live at Yarrabah.  The community has a vibrant visual arts and performing arts culture and is home to the annual Yarrabah Band Festival, an event which brings thousands of visitors to Yarrabah each year.

Elverina Johnson

The Artist

Elverina Johnson’s traditional family name is Bunya Badjil, which means “Good Woman”. Elverina lives at Yarrabah, a coastal Aboriginal community located south east of Cairns situated between the rainforest and the ocean.

Elverina is of Kunganji Gurugulu lineage on her Grandfather’s side and Indinji Gimuy lineage on her Grandmother’s side. Elverina is a direct descendant of King Yinnie of Cairns, and a direct descendant of King Menmuny of the Gunganji Nation of Yarrabah.

Elverina’s enduring custodial ties to her traditional culture are reflected in her artworks, which depict the natural abundance and beauty of her ancestral homelands.

Elverina is a highly respected advocate for her community, and she has been involved in the visual and performing arts industry for over 25 years.

The Artwork

Buluru – Guga Biiba (Story Time – Paper Bark)

This artwork is called Paper Bark. It depicts a traditional “Buluru” (Story Time). ‘Guga Biiba’ is the name for the Paper Bark tree which has great cultural significance to the people from the Yarrabah coastal region. The paper bark if turned on the reverse side reveals patterns of wavy lines that show the growth of the tree itself. The paper bark is also an important natural resource that has long been used in the preparation and cooking of food, shelter, warmth, fire-making and water containers.

Artists 

The Warlpiri People of Central Australia

Mainie’s collection presents original artworks hand-painted by Warlpiri women artists, from the internationally acclaimed Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation. Warlukurlangu is a stronghold of traditional Warlpiri arts, language and culture, at the remote outback community of Yuendumu, located in the Tanami Desert region of Central Australia about 300 kilometres North West of Alice Springs. The original Aboriginal artworks featured in the Mainie collection are based on traditional Warlpiri dot paintings and ceremonial body art designs which have been passed down through countless generations over thousands of years.

Christine Nakamarra Curtis

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The Artist

Christine Nakamarra Curtis Christine was born into a family of artists and spent most of her childhood at a very remote outstation community called Nyirripi located in the desert country of Central Australia. Christine is one of seven sisters. Nyirripi is located about 150km south west of the Aboriginal community of Yuendumu. Yuendumu is the home of the internationally acclaimed Warlukurlangu Aboriginal Artists Corporation. Yuendumu lies around 300 km northwest of Alice Springs in the vast Tanami Desert region, and has a population of about 800. The community is located within the traditional homelands of the Warlpiri Aboriginal people and includes numerous outstations.Christine began painting with the Warlukurlangu Artists in 2007. Warlukurlangu supports Warlpiri artists to preserve their cultural heritage and to earn income from their work. Christine paints her grandparent’s Dreaming on her mother’s side. The Dreaming stories depicted by Christine relate directly to her land, its features and the plants and animals that inhabit it. These sacred stories have been passed down through many generations of her ancestors over thousands of years.

“I like the patterns and all those colours, and the stories. Watching family painting, they show you the Dreaming.”

The Artwork

Ngapa Jukurrpa (Storm Bird Dreaming)

The original paintings depict the Dreamtime Story of how smoke rising from a fire formed a large storm cloud. A bird carried the storm cloud to the west where it fell to the ground as rain. Ngapa means water in the Warlpiri language.

Ngapa Jukurrpa (Storm Cloud Dreaming)

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Jeanie Napangardi Lewis

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The Artist

Jeanie was born around 1950 on Mount Doreen Station, a vast 7,337 squarekilometre cattle property located in the Tanami Desert region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Jeanie’s traditional country is Mina Mina, west of Yuendumu, a small Aboriginal community 290 km north west of Alice Springs. Jeanie’s family lived in and around Mina Mina before moving to Yuendumu, and then on to Nyirripi, where she has lived for many years. Nyirripi is a very remote outstation community about 150 km north west of Yuendumu. Jeanie has been painting since 2005 with the Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation. Warlukurlangu is an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre located in Yuendumu which supports Warlpiri artists to preserve their language and ancient cultural heritage, and to earn income from their art work. Jeanie paints traditional Dreaming stories which have been passed down to her through many generations of her ancestors. The Mina Mina Jukurrpa (Mina Mina Dreaming) is of special significance to Jeanie as Mina Mina has been the homelands of her ancestors for many thousands of years. Jeanie Napangardi Lewis is an eminent and highly collectible Warlpiri Aboriginal artist. Her works are included in the British Museum Collection and have been exhibited in major art galleries around Australia and internationally.

The Artwork

Mina Mina Jukurrpa (Women’s Journey)

The original painting depicts the Dreamtime Story about a journey by a group of Warlpiri women who travelled across the desert gathering a tree vine called Ngalyipi. The Ngalyipi vine has long been used by the Warlpiri women for sacred ceremonies. The vine also has medicinal uses.

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 Evelyn Nampijinpa Daniels

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The Artist

Evelyn was born in 1956 in Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community 290 km northwest of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory of Australia. Evelyn is the younger sister of celebrated Warlpiri artist and ritual leader, Dolly Nampijinpa Daniels, and they would often paint together before Dolly passed away in 2004. Evelyn has been painting with the internationally acclaimed Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, an Aboriginal owned and governed Art Centre in Yuendumu, since 2001. Warlukurlangu is a stronghold for the preservation of the ancient language and culture of the Warlpiri people. Evelyn paints her mother’s and her father’s Jukurrpa, Dreaming stories which relate to the Tanami Desert homelands of her Warlpiri ancestors. The stories were passed down to Evelyn by her older sister Dolly and her mother, and their ancestors before them over countless millennia. Evelyn Nampijinpa Daniels is a distinguished Warlpiri artist whose artworks are exhibited in major art galleries around Australia and internationally.

The Artwork

Watiya-Warnu Jukurrpa (Medicine Seed Dreaming)

The original painting depicts the Dreamtime Story about the gathering of seeds from the Watiya-Warnu trees. The seeds are used as a traditional medicine. The ceremony associated with the gathering of the Watiya-Warnu seeds involves the preparation of a large ground painting.

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Geraldine Napangardi Granites

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The Artist

Geraldine Napangardi Granites was born and has lived in Yuendumu all her life. Yuendumu is a remote Aboriginal community located 290 kms north-west of AliceSprings. Geraldine is the daughter of Alma Nungarrayi Granites, a strong participant of Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation and granddaughter of Paddy Japaljarri Sims (deceased) and Bessie Nakamarra Sims (deceased): two of Warlukurlangu Artists founding artists. Geraldine has four children, two sons and two daughters. She is a shy person who is very involved with her large extended family and enjoys being around children and helping the family’s grandchildren. Geraldine learned to paint by observing her grandfather’s art works, as well as Judy Napangardi Watson’s work (a Warlpiri artist who is at the forefront of a move towards more abstract rendering of Jukurrpa /Dreaming stories). When Judy visits Yuendumu and the Warlukurlangu Art Centre Geraldine loves to listen to Judy’s stories about a special country, Mina Mina. The Mina Mina Dreaming story is an important woman’s story. Geraldine Napangardi Granites has gained a reputation as an artist who has developed a unique, modern interpretation of the traditional culture.

The Artwork

Mina Mina Jukurrpa (Medicine Tree Dreaming)

The original paintings depict the Dreamtime Story about a journey by a group of Warlpiri women who travelled across the desert gathering a vine called Ngalyipi. The Ngalyipi vine has long been used by the Warlpiri women for sacred ceremonies. The vine also has medicinal uses.

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Jennifer Napaljarri Lewis

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The Artist

Jennifer was born in 1962 in Areyonga, an Aboriginal community located in a valley of the Macdonnell Ranges, approximately 220 km south west of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory of Australia. While living in Areyonga, Jennifer met her husband, who was visiting Areyonga from Nyirripi. After she married, Jennifer moved to Nyirripi to be with her husband. Nyirripi is located about 150km south west of the Aboriginal community of Yuendumu. Yuendumu is the home of the internationally acclaimed Warlukurlangu Aboriginal Artists Corporation. Yuendumu lies around 300 km northwest of Alice Springs in the vast Tanami Desert region, and has a population of about 800. Jennifer has been painting with the Warlukurlangu Artists since 2009. Jennifer belongs to the Pitjantjatjara people and her traditional land is Mutitjula at the eastern end of Uluru. Jennifer has a close connection with the Mutitjula Community and it was there that her family taught her to paint. Jennifer loves painting and uses an unrestricted palette with traditional patterns and designs integrated with a modern individualistic style to depict her traditional Jukurrpa stories, in particular Lukarrara Jukurrpa (Desert Fringe Dreaming). Jennifer Napaljarri Lewis’s distinctive artworks are highly collectible and have been exhibited in major galleries in Australia and internationally.

The Artwork

Lukarrara Jukurrpa (Fire Stone Dreaming)

The original painting depicts the Dreamtime Story of how Warlpiri women collect seeds from the Lukarrara grasses. The seeds are ground on a special stone to make flour. The women mix the flour with water to make traditional cakes which are cooked in the fire.

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Long Maggie Nakamarra White

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The Artist

Long Maggie Nakamarra White, so named because of her tall and slim stature, was born c. 1930 in Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community 290 km north-west of Alice Springs. Maggie grew up in Yuendumu with her family. She started painting in 1987 at Warlukurlangu Artists, an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre in Yuendumu. She painted several of her ancestors’ Dreamings including Karnta Jukurrpa (Women’s Dreaming), Ngapa Jukurrpa (Water Dreaming) and Jardiwanpa Jukurrpa (Snake Dreaming). Long Maggie Nakamarra White was one of Warlukurlangu’s most distinguished artists. Her works have been exhibited in museums and art galleries around Australia, and internationally in the USA, England, United Arab Emirates and Singapore.

The Artwork

Ngapa Jukurrpa (Water Bird Dreaming)

The original painting depicts the Dreamtime Story of two rainmakers, who sang to create a storm. The storm was carried across the desert country by a falcon. When the storm fell to the ground, a large lake was formed. Ngapa means water in the Warlpiri language.

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Mary Napangardi Butcher

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The Artist

Mary Napangardi Butcher Mary was born at Mount Dennison, but has spent most of her life in Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community located 290 km north-west of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory of Australia. Mary has been painting with the internationally acclaimed Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre located in Yuendumu, since 1987. Warlukurlangu supports Warlpiri Aboriginal artists to preserve their ancient cultural heritage and language. Mary was greatly influenced by her father Jack Japanangka Butcher (deceased) and his sister Daisy Napanangka Nelson (1930 – 2001), both artists who painted with Warlukurlangu Artists in the early 80s and 90s. Mary would often paint with her sister Florrie Napangardi Jones and with Daisy on the same piece of artwork. Mary paints her Pikilyi Jukurrpa (Pikilyi Dreaming) stories. Pikilyi is a permanent water hole on the desert homelands of the Warlpiri people. It has long been a sacred place. Mary’s Dreaming stories relate to the Warlpiri people and country and describe journeys across the land. These traditional stories were passed down to Mary by her father and grandfather and their ancestors before them over thousands of years. Mary loves to paint, to learn more about her culture. “We family get together and as we paint, we all tell stories”. Mary Napangardi Butcher is an eminent Warlpiri artist and her distinctive artworks are highly sought after by art collectors.

The Artwork

Pikilyi Jukurrpa (Water Serpent Dreaming)

The original painting depicts the Dreamtime Story of two rainbow serpents who were the custodians of Pikilyi, a natural water spring on Warlpiri country. The serpents lived together as man and wife but were from different clans. This was a marriage forbidden by Warlpiri law.

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The Artist

Mary Napangardi Gallagher was born in Napperby, a homestead 120 km from Papunya. When Mary was a young adult she moved with her family to Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community in the Tanami Desert region, around 290 km from Alice Springs in the Northern Territory of Australia. Mary met and married her husband in Yuendumu and later moved to Nyirripi, a small outstation 160 km north west of Yuendumu, to raise her family. Mary is now a grandmother and she and her family still live in Nyirripi. Mary has been painting with Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre located in Yuendumu, since 2006. Mary paints her father’s Jukurrpa, Dreaming stories which relate to Pikilyi Jukurrpa, a large and important waterhole on the desert homelands of the Warlpiri people. Mary remembers playing in this area as a child, while collecting bush tucker with her family. When Mary is not painting she likes to go hunting with her family for goanna and bush tucker. Mary Napangardi Gallagher’s paintings have been exhibited in major galleries around Australia and internationally in the USA, United Arab Emirates and Hong Kong.

The Artwork

Mina Mina Jukurrpa (Desert Journey Dreaming)

The original paintings depict the Dreamtime Story about a journey by a group of Warlpiri women who travelled across the desert gathering a vine called Ngalyipi. The Ngalyipi vine has long been used by the Warlpiri women for sacred ceremonies. The vine also has medicinal uses.

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Phyllis Napurrurla Williams

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The Artist

Phyllis was born a long time ago at Mount Doreen Station, a vast 7,337 square kilometre cattle property located in the Tanami Desert region of the Northern Territory of Australia. As a small child, Phyllis went bush with her family learning all about her country, which has been the traditional homelands of her Warlpiri ancestors for many thousands of years. Later as a young adult, Phyllis worked at Mount Doreen Station before moving to Yuendumu, an Aboriginal community 290 km from Alice Springs. She now lives at Nyirripi, a very remote outstation 150 km west of Yuendumu. Phyllis has been painting since 1988 with the Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre in Yuendumu. Warlukurlangu supports Warlpiri artists to preserve their cultural heritage and earn income from their work. Phyllis paints the Janganpa Jukurrpa (Brush-Tailed Possum Dreaming) and other Dreaming stories that have been passed down to her by her parents, and their ancestors before them over many millennia. Phyllis Napurrurla Williams is an eminent Warlpiri artist and her distinctive artworks are highly sought after by art collectors.

The Artwork

Ngapa Jukurrpa (Fire & Rain Dreaming)

The original painting depicts the Dreamtime Story of how smoke rising from a fire formed a large storm cloud. A bird carried the storm cloud to the west where it fell to the ground as rain. Ngapa means water in the Warlpiri language.

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Portia Napanangka Michaels

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The Artist

Portia was born in 1967 in Alice Springs Hospital, the closest hospital to Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community 290 km north-west of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory of Australia. Portia was born into a family of artists. She is the daughter of Mary Anne Nampijinpa Michaels, a well-known Warlukurlangu artist. Portia has two sisters and two brothers and lives in Nyirripi, an Aboriginal community 150 km west of Yuendumu. Portia has been painting with Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation, an Aboriginal owned and governed art centre in Yuendumu, since 2007. Warlukurlangu supports Warlpiri artists to preserve their cultural heritage and earn income from their work. Portia paints Lappi Lappi Jukurrpa (Lappi Lappi Dreaming) from her mother’s side and Janganpa Jukurrpa (Brush-Tailed Possum Dreaming) from her father’s side. These stories have been passed down to her by her father and mother and their ancestors before them over thousands of years. “I watched my mother paint and my grandmother paint. They told me all about the dreaming”Portia Napanangka Michaels is a highly collectible Warlpiri artist who works have been exhibited in major art galleries around Australia and overseas.

The Artwork

Lappi Lappi Jukurrpa (Rainbow Serpent Dreaming)

The painting depicts the Dreamtime Story about Lappi Lappi, a permanent fresh water source in the rocks on Warlpiri country. Lappi Lappi is the home of a mythical rainbow serpent called Warnayarra.


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Bessie Nakamarra Sims

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The Artist

Bessie Nakamarra Sims was born in the 1930s on her ancestral homelands in the Central Desert region of Australia. She lived for many years with her people in the desert before first coming into contact with white settlers. Bessie painted with the Warlukurlangu Artists, an Aboriginal owned art centre located at Yuendumu, a remote desert community west of Alice Springs. Bessie’s paintings depicted Dreamtime stories, which had been passed to her through many generations of her Warlpiri ancestors over thousands of years. Bessie Nakamarra Sims paintings have been exhibited in major art galleries in Australia and around the world including, USA, United Kingdom and Scandinavia.

The Artwork

Ngapa Jukurrpa (Desert Rain Dreaming)

The original painting depicts the Dreamtime Story of how smoke rising from a fire formed a large storm cloud. A bird carried the storm cloud to the west where it fell to the ground as rain. Ngapa means water in the Warlpiri language.


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Joy Nangala Brown

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The Artist

Joy Nangala Brown was born in Alice Springs in 1966 and grew up on her ancestral homelands in the remote Tanami Desert region of Central Australia. Joy is the daughter of successful Pintupi artist Pegleg Jampijinpa and her paintings depict Dreamtime Stories, which have been passed down to her through many generations of her ancestors over thousands of years. Joy paints with the world acclaimed Warlukurlangu Artists, an Aboriginal owned arts centre, which supports traditional artists to preserve their culture. Joy Nangala Brown’s paintings have been exhibited in major art galleries in Australia and around the world including, USA, United Arab Emirates and Singapore.

The Artwork

Yumari Jukurrpa (Rock Pools Dreaming)

The original painting depicts the Dreamtime Story of a forbidden love between a man and a woman from different clans.  The couple would meet in secret at a group of rocks in the desert called Yumari.  The circles represent the pools of water in the rocks.


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Vivienne Nakamarra Kelly

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The Artist

Vivienne Nakamarra Kelly is from Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community in the Tanami Desert region of Central Australia. Vivienne paints with the world acclaimed Warlukurlangu Artists, an Aboriginal owned arts centre located at Yuendumu, which supports traditional artists to preserve their culture. Vivienne’s paintings depict Dreamtime Stories, which have been passed down to her through many generations of her Warlpiri ancestors over thousands of years. Vivienne Nakamarra Kelly is an emerging Warlpiri artist whose artworks have been exhibited in major art galleries in Australia and internationally.

The Artwork

Ngapa Jukurrpa (Rain Bird Dreaming)

The original painting depicts the Dreamtime story of how smoke rising from a fire formed a large storm cloud.  A bird carried the storm cloud to the west where it fell to the ground as rain. Ngapa means water in the Warlpiri language.


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Ormay Nangala Gallagher

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The Artist

Ormay Nangala Gallagher was born in Alice Springs hospital, the closest hospital to her family’s home at Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community 290 km from Alice Springs in the Northern Territory of Australia. Ormay paints with the world acclaimed Warlukurlangu Artists, an Aboriginal owned arts centre located at Yuendumu, which supports traditional artists to preserve their culture. Ormay’s paintings depict Dreamtime Stories, which have been passed down to her through many generations of her ancestors over thousands of years. Ormay Nangala Gallagher is a highly collectible Aboriginal artist whose artworks have been exhibited in major art galleries in Australia and internationally.

The Artwork

Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dance Dreaming)

The original painting depicts the Dreamtime Story of a rock pool in the desert where the Yankirri (emus) came to find water.  In Warlpiri art, emus are represented by their footprints.  There is also a dance for this story which is performed during Warlpiri ceremonies.


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Pauline Napangardi Gallagher

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The Artist

Pauline was born in 1952 at Yuendumu, a remote Aboriginal community about 300 km north west of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory of Australia. Pauline paints her father’s Dreamtime stories, the Pikilyi Jurkurrpa and the Mina Mina Jukurrpa, which relate to her ancestral homelands and the ancient beliefs and customs of the Warlpiri people. The Dreamtime stories depicted in Pauline’s artworks were passed down to her by her parents and their parents, and before them through many generations of her Warlpiri ancestors over thousands of years. Pauline Napangardi Gallagher’s artworks are highly collectible and exhibited in galleries around the world including France, Hong Kong, Germany, USA and Singapore.

The Artwork

Mina Mina Jukurrpa (Sacred Vine Dreaming)

The original paintings depict the Dreamtime Story about a journey by a group of Warlpiri women who travelled across the desert gathering a vine called Ngalyipi. The Ngalyipi vine has long been used by the Warlpiri women for sacred ceremonies. The vine also has medicinal uses.


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